5. Site of stone Indian fort

 

 The last Indian raid/clash in Augusta County was fought to a bloody standstill in this area (in Swoope, Virginia), just across Middle River from Trinity Point farm.  A number of blood skirmishes were fought around the Churchville-area, from the colonial period through the Civil War. Some records of these can be found in the county archives. One of the purposes of the Trinity Point Project is to conduct ceremonial activities which will serve to  clear the negative energy in the land.

 

 In keeping with my belief in this historical evidence, this land being sacred ground for the first American Indian tribes in the past, have proposed the following mission statement as the  TRINITY POINT PROJECT, FIRST AMERICAN TRIBUNAL OUTREACH POLICY:

 

 To establish meaningful gatherings with first American Indian people and facilitate this by opening up ancient and sacred places of power for these people to return, pray, dance, conduct ceremony, sacred circle and share their ancient tribal wisdom, myth and story. In this way we will heal the land from the memories of past injustices and create a loving, trusting and open cross-cultural synthesis among all peoples, and honor and celebrate one another as equals.

Our goal is to educate ourselves to the extent in which Native Indian blood ancestry permeates greater US American culture. Thus, our larger purpose here is to give honor to that part of ourselves and to affect a greater reemergence of native culture within our great nation.

 

I have good reason to believe that (among some Native American tribes), that Trinity Point is recognized as a major point of power on the continent of “Turtle Island.” To contact this council, click here

 

 

 

 

6. Cave Spring

 

 This is nearby to the Indian fort site, a sacred place of much beauty. The cave here has a sloping stone floor. A natural spoke hole at the top of this cave sits directly over the outflow point of a natural freshwater spring which forms a clear pond in front of the cave before flowing back into Middle River. It is sufficient to also note that Cave Spring is currently owned by the city of Staunton as a potential water source. Since the hurricane damage in 1985, there are no public routes to this site. Cave Spring area is surrounded by three large areas of private land.

 

 It is believed by some that Cave Spring had previously been a sacred place for vision questing by native tribes who may have inhabited this part of Virginia, as far back as 17,000 years. I once conducted a self-styled vision quest here some years ago, where I experienced the vivid presence of a very powerful male native warrior spirit in this location. This warrior-being, after checking me out, was gracious not to have thrown me out. I believe he could have done so if he had wanted to.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7. UFO Sighting Area

 

 On August 2, 1979, at about 10 pm, Eastern Daylight Time, from the eastern side of the yard of the main estate home, three eyewitnesses–– including myself–– witnessed what appeared to be a UFO. The duration of this event may have been as long as a minute or more. We were all quite dazzled by what we saw that evening. I will render, in the appendix, greater detail of this event. This detail will also provide an opening in which I will introduce the star gate energetic form which seems to have been essential to this phenomenal occurrence.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trinity Point Project

Social Magic for Planetary Healing

A major download point on the Earth’s magnetic grid, located near Churchville, Virginia.

 

8. Allen Cemetery

 

 The oldest known settler’s cemetery in Augusta County is located on this land. It is possible that John Tremble, a founding father of Augusta County, is buried here after having been killed in the last Indian skirmish in the area. This graveyard has been previously vandalized and is quite overgrown by underbrush at this time. An intended project for this land is to restore and take care of the grave sites at this spot. Interested volunteers for this and other projects at Trinity Point Farm and project site, are invited to contact me.

 

9. Eagle Rock

 

 Eagle Rock is a beautiful sheer cliff face with a cleft in the rock, reputed to have once been a nesting spot for eagles. I have held silent prayer in my heart for years that eagles may one day return to this nesting place.  Happily, in the autumn of 2008, I saw an American Bald Eagle flying over the scrub pine forest just behind Eagle Rock. Other residents of the area have also spotted some of these rare and beautiful birds nearby. We look forward to having a formal tribal ceremony to encourage these birds to again nest here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10. Blue Hole

 

 This site is located just slightly up river from Eagle Rock. It is a smaller rock form, with a sheer cliff face that stands just above a deep pool in Middle River. A very old and large oak tree graces the top of this form. Many fish inhabit the river bottom here. Also, spirit/devic activity here is quite intense. These numerous spirit beings have showed as bubble-type forms in recently taken photographs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11. Indian Mound Site

 

 This site is located in a pasture on private land at the Eastover farm nearby. It  was exhumed in 1963. The bones and artifacts found here were from the Iroquois nation and determined to be about 800 years old. Additional artifacts and bones were also found in this area and were determined to be about 6,000 years old. No identifiable tribe for these latter artifacts has been determined. To the best of my knowledge, the bones exhumed here are being kept at the Department of Anthropology at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History in Washington, DC. Artifacts removed from this site are being kept in Center for Archaeological Research, William and Mary University, Virginia. As I have previously mentioned, I believe that human activity has occurred in this area for many thousands of years.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                    Copyright 2017 by Philip Khnopp

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